Skip to main content

Doe v. Madison Metropolitan School District

Description:  A Madison Metropolitan School District policy instructs district employees to assist children of any age to adopt a transgender identity at school upon the child’s request without notice to or consent from parents, to conceal from parents the fact that school personnel are doing this unless the child “consents” to the parents being told, and even instructs district employees to conceal these facts from parents.


Schoolchildren board a school bus
Friday, Jan 14, 2022

The following quote may be attributed to Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Counsel Kate Anderson, director of the ADF Center for Parental Rights, regarding the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s decision Friday to take the case of a group of parents challenging a Madison Metropolitan School District policy that instructs district employees to assist children of any age, upon their request, to adopt an identity at odds with the child’s biological sex without notice to or consent from parents and to conceal from parents the fact that school personnel are doing this unless the child “consents” to the parents being told:

“School policies that exclude parents from children’s gender identity decisions are harming children across the country. We are hopeful that the Wisconsin Supreme Court will take the lead in protecting a parent’s right to be a parent.”

The following quote may be attributed to Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty Deputy Counsel Luke Berg, who is lead counsel in the case, Doe v. Madison Metropolitan School District:

“We are pleased the Wisconsin Supreme Court has agreed to hear this important case. The Madison Metropolitan School District cannot make decisions reserved for parents.”

ADF attorneys together with lead counsel from WILL filed the lawsuit in February 2020 challenging the school district policy. WILL and ADF attorneys represent multiple families at the school district in challenging the policy, which violates constitutionally protected parental rights.

Alliance Defending Freedom is an alliance-building, non-profit legal organization committed to protecting religious freedom, free speech, parental rights, and the sanctity of life.

# # #


Commentary


Previous News Releases


Legal Documents


Related Resources

ABOUT Roger Brooks

Roger G. Brooks serves as senior counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom, where he is a key member of the Center for Conscience Initiatives. Brooks focuses his efforts on protecting freedom of speech, free exercise of religion, student privacy, and parental rights. Prior to joining ADF in 2018, Brooks worked with the New York law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore for 25 years, 19 of those as a partner in the litigation department. Brooks received an A.B. from Princeton University, followed by a master’s degree in history and a Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia. After law school, Brooks clerked with the Hon. John D. Butzner, Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. He received his Master of Divinity from Regent College Seminary in Vancouver, British Columbia. Brooks served on the board of ADF (2012-2014) and on the board of the Christian Legal Society (2002-2011). He is a member of the state bars of New York and North Carolina.

ABOUT Kate Anderson

Kate Anderson serves as senior counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom, where she is the director of the Center for Parental Rights. Since joining ADF in 2015, Anderson has focused on protecting the conscience rights of individuals being unjustly compelled to forfeit their beliefs under threat of government retaliation, heavy fines, or other punishment. Prior to joining ADF, Anderson was an associate attorney with Ellis, Li & McKinstry, PLLC, in Seattle, where she litigated both civil and criminal cases. She obtained her law degree magna cum laude in 2009 from Gonzaga University School of Law, where she served on the Gonzaga Law Review. She is admitted to the state bars of Arizona and Washington, the U.S. Supreme Court, and several federal district and appellate courts.