Skip to main content

Country Mill Farms v. City of East Lansing

Description:  City of East Lansing officials exiled Steve Tennes and his popular family business, Country Mill Farms, after he posted on Facebook that he follows the Catholic Church’s teachings regarding marriage when hosting weddings at his family farm. At issue is an unconstitutional policy that city officials adopted specifically to shut out Tennes and Country Mill Farms purely for that reason. The city did this even though Tennes, his family, and the orchard are in Charlotte, 22 miles from East Lansing, well outside the city’s boundaries and beyond its jurisdiction.


Country Mill Farms owner Steve Tennes and his family
Monday, Jul 26, 2021

WHO: Country Mill Farms owner Steve Tennes, Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys

WHAT: Available for media interviews following trial in Country Mill Farms v. City of East Lansing

WHEN: Trial begins Tuesday, July 27 at 8:45am EDT and will likely continue through Friday, July 30

WHERE: U.S. District Court, Western District of Michigan, Southern Division, 174 Federal Building, 410 W. Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan

KALAMAZOO, Mich. – Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys will represent Country Mill Farms owner Steve Tennes in court this week in Country Mill Farms v. City of East Lansing.

At issue is an unconstitutional policy that city officials adopted specifically to ban Tennes and Country Mill Farms, his family’s fruit orchard, from participating in the city’s farmer’s market. The city enacted this policy after Tennes posted on Facebook that he follows the Catholic Church’s teachings about marriage, including when he participates in weddings at his family farm. After learning of Tennes’ religious beliefs and practices, city officials sought to drive him out of the market he has served since 2010. The city crafted and passed the new policy even though Tennes, his family, and the orchard are in Charlotte, 22 miles from East Lansing, well outside the city’s boundaries. The city then applied the policy to Tennes alone, excluding only his farm from the market based on the policy change.

“Small business owners should be free to live, speak and operate their business consistent with their religious beliefs without fear of government punishment,” said ADF Senior Counsel Kate Anderson. “The city of East Lansing’s attempts to not only damage Steve’s livelihood and reputation, but to change his deeply-held views on marriage, is wrong and violates our most basic constitutional freedoms. While ousting him from the market, city officials publicly ridiculed his faith. One official even called Tennes’ Catholic beliefs ‘bigot[ed],’ ‘ridiculous, horrible, [and] hateful.’ We are looking forward to bringing these issues to the court this week.”

“The U.S. Supreme Court has rightfully rejected this type of religious hostility. Even this district court at an earlier stage in this case acknowledged that East Lansing had likely passed an unconstitutional ordinance,” said ADF Senior Counsel and Vice President of Appellate Advocacy John Bursch, former solicitor general of Michigan. “We look forward to proving why the court should permanently prevent East Lansing from targeting Steve on the basis of his Catholic beliefs.”

Alliance Defending Freedom is an alliance-building, non-profit legal organization committed to protecting religious freedom, free speech, parental rights, and the sanctity of life.

# # # | Ref. 57650



Commentary


Previous News Releases


Legal Documents


Related Resources

Resource page: Freedom of conscience

ABOUT Kate Anderson

Kate Anderson serves as senior counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom, where she is the director of the Center for Parental Rights. Since joining ADF in 2015, Anderson has focused on protecting the conscience rights of individuals being unjustly compelled to forfeit their beliefs under threat of government retaliation, heavy fines, or other punishment. Prior to joining ADF, Anderson was an associate attorney with Ellis, Li & McKinstry, PLLC, in Seattle, where she litigated both civil and criminal cases. She obtained her law degree magna cum laude in 2009 from Gonzaga University School of Law, where she served on the Gonzaga Law Review. She is admitted to the state bars of Arizona and Washington, the U.S. Supreme Court, and several federal district and appellate courts.